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Fan Car Friday: 1932 Ford Roadster Flathead V8

For this Fan Car Friday we take a look at a 1932 Roadster owned by our friends over at Por15. Fan Car Friday is a segment where we want to share with the world the automobiles that our fans have. These cars are not for sale and we have absolutely no affiliation/relationship with the cars, the build or the owners. We are not paid, endorsed, or given discounts when we work with another company. We simply saw the photos and felt they should be shared with the world to inspire others on their build. Or, simply put, its great eye candy for those of us who can’t make it to car shows or meetups as often as we would like. This post was made with written consent from the owner.

A major problem with any great classic car, especially ones that are almost 90 years old, is that they are rusted out and full of holes. If you don’t have to worry about any rust, most people feel like they can tackle the rest of the build when it comes to a restoration. Por15 was created as a rust preventative paint company and they saw an opportunity to restore a car from the ground up and completely overdo it. Ensuring the car wont rust for another 150 years.

 

Luckily they are a company owned and operated by guys who love classic cars and preserving the past.  That means an over the top budget, a high allocation of resources and they picked a fun car to work with (Not yet another Mustang or Bronco that companies seem so fond of doing); to quote John Hammond they “spared no expense”.

The car itself is a 1932 Ford Roadster Flathead V8, and while it may have originally had 85 horsepower it can now move down the road with ease and it looks fantastic while doing it. There is truly nothing quite like a Ford Flathead V8 engine, it is easily the most beautiful engine ever designed. 1932 was the introductory year for the Flathead V8. It was designed to be a mass market V engine that was also a mass market 8 cylinder engine, Ford wanted it so the common man could afford more power. It was not an easy process though, the engine was prone to cracking as well as seized crankshaft bearings due to oil starvation. Despite this, the engine was widely produced until 1953, and production even continued until 1973 in Germany for a series of trucks. The team spent a long time deciding on what design to go with for the finned aluminum heads and their choice really makes Henry Ford’s engine pop in their Roadster. The performance isn’t too bad either.

After spending an entire year on making the engine perfect and exactly what they wanted, they moved onto the rest of the car itself. This Roadster is straight out of the hotrodders playbook, something not seen to often these days when the newest trend is all about customizing the car into something no one else in the world has. It is a fenderless convertible coupe body with a lowered chassis, louvered cowl with blue-dot taillights. They also decided to go with some Stromberg 97 carburetors, as were first added to the design in 1936. For the transmission they are using a T5 manual that leads into a Ford banjo-style rear end.

 

All in all it makes for a terrific hotrod. Something that will look great at a show, look great on the road and above all else-be fun to drive. The team says their favorite thing about this vehicle is the sense of pride they have with it and the fact that it will live strongly into whatever the next wave of automobiles are.

 

Fan Car Friday: 1960 Corvette

Like many of us, Barry had a dream car. Something he constantly thought about and was always building in his head. Something in his mind everyday. Something that he knew he had to have one day. After many years of dreaming about it, he decided to act on this and purchased a 1960 Corvette. Originally, though, he wanted to buy one from the same year he was born-1959, but you don’t always get what you want in life.

Fan Car Friday is a segment where we want to share with the world the automobiles that our fans have. These cars are not for sale and we have absolutely no affiliation/relationship with the cars, the build or the owners. We are not paid, endorsed, or given discounts when we work with another company. We simply saw the photos and felt they should be shared with the world to inspire others on their build. Or, simply put, its great eye candy for those of us who can’t make it to car shows or meetups as often as we would like. This post was made with written consent from the owner.

 

The car you see today started off horribly when it came into Barry’s possession. Bad enough to make you wonder why he would ever start with it. The car was horribly crashed and had been cut in half only to have another car be grafted onto the back…using pallet wood. Making the doors fit horribly and the car unsafe to drive. But, there was something special about this car. It may have been a 1960 Corvette but it was finished in December of 1959. Not only that, many parts like the speedometer were dated to October 28, the day after he was born. Barry had a choice, he could do an easy build with another car, or this one in disarray that was worth doing and meant something to him. Without hesitation, Barry choose the latter.

 

 

Barry had always wanted better suspension, he always planned on installing C4 components. What he didn’t plan on though, was having to replace the horrible frame that was basically held together with bubblegum and paperclips. His buddy luckily had a spare frame lying around and began modifying it to accept the C4 parts.

Then Barry worked on splitting the frame apart again to re-index it and have it fitted correctly, not without reinforcing the rocker panels with steel though. Now it was time to paint, or almost ready. Barry always envisioned having widened rear quarter panels with fiberglass. He took meticulous care to do it properly and feather everything in so it looked as factory as this modification could. The body was soon painted, the chrome was replated and the body was reattached to the frame. Things were starting to come together-it was finally taking shape.

 

 

After redoing the electrical, interior and installing the engine there isn’t much else left to do but pop on a fresh set of wheels and go for a cruise. But this is where the real issue in the build surfaced. Barry needed new wheels to fit his wide tubs and he couldn’t find a set white walled tired on the market wide enough for his beauty. Nor could he find a set of wheels with a fake white wall in them to give him the modern tires he craved at an affordable price. There is a famous engineer by the name Heckendorn who used to say “Why buy it when you can build it for twice the price?” and that was the same method Barry took in his endeavor. Why buy an expensive set of white walled wheels when you can make you own company, design, mill, finish and then sell them yourself?

 

Thus enters the Deluxe Wheel Company. After designing his own wheels and having them manufactured, Barry could now have the wheels and drivability he wanted while keeping the look he desired. Having larger disc brakes with them were just an added bonus. Now the car looks stock, unless you know your Corvettes. You will notice leather on the dash and door panels instead of vinyl, new reclining seats, power windows, a modern radio hidden inside the shell of his old one and some modern gauges. Open the hood, and the cat is out of the bag. There is a modern 5.3L LS1 and T-56 six-speed from a Camaro SS. There are modern chrome polished intakes, new water pump, aluminum radiator, custom exhaust and new headers.

Barry’s favorite thing about this vehicle is that he is able to just jump in the car and go. Whether it is a long distance roadtrimp, going to the local car show, going for a cruise or driving like he stole it; he truly enjoys never having to worry if the car can keep pace with him.

Fan Car Friday: Red 1971 Chevelle

For today’s Fan Car Friday we get to share Roger’s 1971 Chevelle. This is a Chevelle of Hollywood fame. There are over 100 different movies where the 1971 Chevelle makes a clear appearance, and this one comes from the widely successful Anchorman 2. During one of the most notable scenes in the movie you can clearly see this Roger and his beauty drive past the actors for almost 10 seconds of screen time.

1971 Chevelle in Anchorman 2

Fan Car Friday is a segment where we want to share with the world the automobiles that our fans have. These cars are not for sale and we have absolutely no affiliation/relationship with the cars, the build or the owners, we simply saw the photos and felt they should be shared with the world to inspire others on their build. Or, simply put, its great eye candy for those of us who can’t make it to car shows or meetups as often as we would like. This post was made with written consent from the owner.

 

1971 Chevelle

 

Throughout his life Roger owned many muscle cars, but after starting a family he had to trade that style in for a more family friendly car. As time went on and things started to settle in Roger was able to be on the lookout for his next muscle car again. During his tenure at the Air Force Roger spent many years looking for the right vehicle and one day he finally found it. Despite his desire to own it, Roger was putting his family before his hobby and decided to let it pass because they did not have the proper funds to buy it. That is a tough thing to do considering Roger’s daughter, Jen, was always bugging her mom saying “I wish he would hurry up and just buy one” to which his wife Jean would respond “Don’t rush him, I don’t want him buying one he really doesn’t really like”. I guess the old saying is true, every good man has an even better woman behind him; and in this case it was two very supportive women.
1971 Chevelle

 

Time passed and it just so happened that when his wife and daughter were out of town that Roger found his 71 Chevelle. Of all places, it was only 10 miles away from his house. He immediately fell in love when he saw it. He was heading off to South Carolina’s Run to the Sun show and wanted to give the car some thought before really giving it a thorough look. There were many beautiful cars at Myrtle Beach, but Roger continued to compare them to the Chevelle. He came very close to buying a 1965 SS Chevelle in red, but it did not have the big block he desired.1971 Chevelle Dash

 

The entire ride back from South Carolina Roger had one thing on his mind, the Chevelle. After a quick test drive, he knew it was the one for him, and purchased it in March of 2006. It drove great, was in good shape and it had everything he was looking for. The Chevelle is equipped with a big block, power breaks, power steering, A/C, tilt wheel, bucket seats, Turbo 400 transmission, Cowl Induction hood, Super Sport stripes, badges, wheels and it was in his favorite color-red. Roger was too excited to snap a few photos for Jean and Jen, he only hoped they would like it as much as he did.1971 Chevelle Interior

 

As it turns out, Jen is as car crazy as Roger is. She quickly gave the car the nickname “The Girl”, she’s the official photographer of the car and she truly loves the vehicle. While Jean may not be as diehard a fan as her daughter and husband, she loves riding in the Chevelle. Especially if it is a coastline drive.

Roger’s family know how to truly enjoy a vehicle. They love to take the car out on the road frequently. Whether its cruising to a local show or going out of town, its always a fun ride. The Chevelle hasn’t visited every state in the USA but it has crossed many stateliness going to Florida, Mississippi, Tennessee, North Carolina, Georgia and Virginia. With the 700R4 transmission this vehicle is able to get 20mpg on the highway even with the A/C on and the RPMs stay close to 2000 at 70mph.1971 Chevelle Engine

 

After finding the original build sheet Roger was able to determine that it is a local car to Georgia. From this they found the original dealership (Bill Nash Chevrolet in Monroe Georgia) as well as the original owners! This car is in the condition it is today due to 12 years of care with help from Roger’s friends Dan, Tommy, Gary, David, Dana and Bill. Roger’s favorite thing about the Chevelle is how much it maintains the stock, original 1971 appearance. Rogers says he looks forward to attending more cruise ins and meeting new friends along the way.

Fan Car Friday: 1952 Ford F1 Pickup

This Black Friday edition of Fan Car Friday comes to us from David. His 1952 Ford F1 pickup truck seems very fitting for Thanksgiving. Thanksgiving celebrates the first harvest of the pilgrims in the New World in 1621. Not only does this truck just have the right feel for this time of year, it is centered on a 1900’s business that existed due to a need of harvested grain by a local town.

Fan Car Friday is a segment where we want to share with the world the automobiles that our fans have. These cars are not for sale and we have absolutely no affiliation/relationship with the cars, the build or the owners, we simply saw the photos and felt they should be shared with the world to inspire others on their build. Or, simply put, its great eye candy for those of us who can’t make it to car shows or meetups as often as we would like. This post was made with written consent from the owner.

1952 Ford F1 Pickup Gas Station

The continued existence of this vehicle is somewhat of an oddity of itself. Often when people think “classic pickup” the 1951 Chevy 3100 comes to mind or maybe the 1955 ford F100 does and some of the younger folks will have cars like the late 60’s Ford F100 appear in their head. It is not too often that you will find a 1952 F1 with the distinct shark tooth grill at your local Cars & Coffee. In fact, this is one of the vehicles I keep on my radar when I have the chance to see a classic pickup and I have only seen a handful in the last 10 years.

1952 Ford F1 Pickup Grill

David’s 1952 F1 comes with a great backstory, and after 20 years of restoration it better have a tale to tell.  It starts off with David wanting a classic pickup, but due to family and work constraints, he had to do the right thing and put off his dreams of purchasing a classic until he happened upon one in Farmville, VA. It was in remarkable shape for its age, had little rust, the engine ran (albeit not too well), which all made it perfect for what he had in mind.

1952 Ford F1 Pickup before

See, David grew up in Fairfax, VA. No, not the Fairfax, VA we all know now. The old one. The one without 30 story high buildings, little microcities and an interconnected train system. Instead, the one that was filled with rural areas, many family farms and livestock dispersed throughout. David’s aunt Mildred and uncle Herman owned a local farm supply business in the center of town called Fairfax Hay and Grain. David spent many years of his childhood and teenage years working there. Whether it was working in the store, selling feed, or riding along on deliveries to local farmers, it all left a good impression on him. As he grew older David was able to start making deliveries on his own. It was hard work loading hay into barn lofts and carrying around 100lb feed bags, but it was an experience he wouldn’t trade for anything.

With a hard work also comes the fun of people who do an honest day’s work for a living, and there were manys. They would stop in, sit around the pot-bellied stove and tell stories from their life; which left David with some very fond memories. Not only that, this pot-bellied stove is where he learned about business, responsibility, accountability, customer service and life in general; All values and principles that have guided David throughout his life.

1952 Ford F1 Pickup Engine

The truck itself has the original 215 overhead valve inline six cylinder engine, marking the first year that Ford decided to move away from flathead engines (Though the eight cylinder flathead lasted a few years longer). The entire fuel system from the tank to the carb has been replaced, the brake lines were redone, the master cylinder, radiator and cooling system were replaced, he overhauled the engine, the 4.27 rear was replaced with a Yukon 3.54 and the brakes were replaced.  The performance of the truck has been vastly improved, but it still prefers being driven at 50mph or less.

David can also proudly say that he painted the chassis, engine compartment, and undercarriage parts himself. When it came to the body, a company is Warsaw, VA did the work one piece at a time as the truck was taken apart in a Juniper Green to capture the color of old delivery trucks. The custom lettering on the doors was done by a pinstriping business only about an hour away from FantomWorks in Virginia Beach. The truck itself was finished in September of 2017 and has many custom touches on the interior. The “F-1” logo is sewn into the carpets, the interior is completely redone and there are burlap inserts in the seats and door panels with the Wayne Feeds logo printed on them. After many rounds of searching on the internet and making various phone calls without any lukc on finding a burlap printer, David was able to simply buy some paper sized burlap from Walmart and print the logo at home. Who would have guessed?

1952 Ford F1 Pickup Seat

David’s intent with this truck was never to be a show truck, just a fun driver to use locally. Despite this, he has won a number of trophies and received much attention wherever he goes. If the truck itself isn’t enough to stick in your memory, the aptly named mannequin that follows the truck around is. His name is Herman and he is always adorned in his bib overalls and straw hat. He is either sitting in the passenger seat or sitting on the feedbag outside the truck. While Herman isn’t much for conversation on long trips, he has certainly sparked a number of them!

David’s favorite thing about the truck is how many people can relate to the truck or remember the Hay and Grain business that closed in the late 70’s. Most of all, it serves as a tribute to David’s aunt and uncle. Two of the finest and caring people he has ever known and both of whom have had a significant impact on his life.

Fan Car Friday: 1989 Lincoln Town Car Limousine

In honor of Thanksgiving, this Fan Car Friday will feature a vehicle large enough to haul your entire family and maybe even your in-laws… if you can bear them. We’ll be taking a look at Charles’ choice 1989 Town Car Limousine. Fan Car Friday is a segment where we want to share with the world the automobiles that our fans have. These cars are not for sale and we have absolutely no affiliation/relationship with the cars, the build or the owners, we simply saw the photos and felt they should be shared with the world to inspire others on their build. Or, simply put, its great eye candy for those of us who can’t make it to car shows or meetups as often as we would like. This post was made with written consent from the owner.

1989 Lincoln Town Car Limo
The Town Car Limos from the 80’s were easy to find in the US during their heyday. Over in the UK, it’s quite a different story though, they were somewhat rare and hard to find when they were new. So when Charles found this vehicle back in 2011, he knew right away that he wanted to do a full restoration and bring it back to its former glory. That meant new paint, a new interior that kept its distinct ‘80s vibe, a very large new vinyl roof, a better made ceiling structure and brand new mechanics all around.
Despite a number of modifications being done to the vehicle, it is still an almost all numbers matching car; probably the only numbers matching 1989 Town Car Limo at this point. Charles has restored a number of vehicles from Cadillacs to Trans Ams, despite that Charles felt out of his comfort zone with this build. In fact, he is the only fan so far we are aware of who has done a restoration on a Limo!
The vehicle originally came to Charles with the paint chipping, the heating core unusable, headliner was sagging, the steering was worthless, the control arms pulled back when accelerating and the brakes were iffy at best. The car was damp, it smelled when you opened the door and there was water entering the Limo. Needless to say, this was far from the epitome of luxury it was designed to be.

1989 Lincoln Town Car Limousine
After getting the Limo home, the transmission blew up on Charles. He had to find a replacement. Once he did, he then had to make it fit. Luckily, there is more room on a vehicle like this compared to most, so it wasn’t too difficult an issue to solve. He was able to sort out the suspension, brakes and fuel lines on his own from having the experience from the previously mentioned restorations. But when it came to the body mounts, he understandably had it sent out to a shop. Once it came back, Charles went back to work on the heater core, the only comment Charles had for that process was “Thank god for YouTube”.

1989 Lincoln Town Car Limousine PaintNow that the mechanical components of the car were done, it was time to move onto the looks of the vehicle. All of the rusted panels were cut out, new ones were created and welded in. Then it was time for a repainting. The car was originally silver, but Charles wanted it to be done in a Ford white so it could be used for weddings. Afterword, he started to strip the headliner so he could get to the bolts that held the sunroof in. That sunroof had to go; it was letting water in and was a problem for the car’s overall longevity. Once it was filled in with metal to create a continuous roof, the entirety of the roof was sealed in with Por15 to prevent any issues from coming back. Charles rounded it all off by putting in a new straight through exhaust system, a bigger transmission cooler and gave it a new filter as well to finish the car in mid 2016.

1989 Lincoln Town Car Limousine GutsThe car now is used for weddings, hauling lucky couples around on their big day. Charles did not buy this with the intention to make money for himself, but it always helps with the bills. It gets to see a few outings a year. It is always a special moment when an older couple who met in the late 80’s get to ride in this, it really captures a feel that brings them back to the days when they were younger and had just met. We’re not big on living like a celebrity or being glamorous here at FantomWorks; we are simply guys working in a shop who happen to be filmed doing their work. But Charles offered to give us a ride if we’re ever in the UK and, well, we may just have to take him up on that.

 

SEMA 2017

Most of the FantomWorks team joined Dan down in Las Vegas for the annual SEMA show.  It was a week of cars, fans, meet and greets and other miscellaneous adventures.  The whole team enjoyed the sights at the Hoover Dam as well as Red Rock Canyon getting to enjoy the grandeur and magnificence of what man and mother nature can create.  We all got to enjoy a huge group dinner and most of us tried to make it to breakfast together, some days making it to breakfast was an event in itself.  In between Dan signing autographs at the Por15 booth and doing live events for Velocity, Dan did get drive a Lamborghini Aventador around the city.  Instead of manning a booth and showing a car, Dan was able to walk around SEMA for business purposes. He found an incredible 3D printer, CNC machine and a scanning system that would be invaluable for the shop.  We brought back some good stories and a ton of pictures, to see more check out our Facebook photo album here.

Thanks for sharing the love and support you guys and gals give us and we look forward to next year at SEMA, when we once again will attempt to bring an epic build and hopefully achieve another speeding work of art.

Fan Car Friday: Red’s 1964 Ford Galaxie

Fan Car Friday is a segment where we want to share with the world the automobiles that our fans have. Today’s photos were provided by V8 Speed Shop; we have no affiliation by them and we are not endorsed in any way, shape or form by them – We are simply using their photos. These cars are not for sale and we have absolutely no affiliation/relationship with the cars, the build or the owners (Nor do the owners pay or sponsor us in any way, shape of form), we saw the photos and felt they should be shared with the world to inspire others on their build. Or, simply put, its great eye candy for those of us who can’t make it to car shows or meetups as often as we would like. This post was written with written consent from the owner.

1964 Ford Galaxie

This week we take a look at our friend Red Lehr’s 1964 Galaxie Fastback from lehrsmeatmarket.com. Unlike many kids these days, Red was lucky enough to have something with style as his first car. At the age of 16 he was the happy owner of a 1964 Galaxie. Red drove that car around everywhere, which included a couple dates with a few sweethearts when he was back in highschool. On one of these dates he was cruising on the highway going 55 when a Mazda GLC turned hard in front of him. Red ended up hitting that Mazda (and the two drunks driving it) and sent it flying. The result was his Galaxie now carried the title of “totaled”. Like any of us could imagine, it broke his heart. He swore that one day he would have another and he would build it right.

1964 Ford Galaxie Trim Side

Fast forward 30 years and Red came across another Galaxie in Nevada. He promptly purchased it and shipped it home without a second thought. After going back and forth a few times on what to start with, Red decided it needed to be repainted. Originally he had a light blue Galaxie, but something was steering him towards a dark blue this time. It showed off the lines and just seemed better suited for the car. At the same time it was being repainted Red worked on polishing the stainless and aluminum trim to a mirror finish. The metal now looked great, the paint job though? Not so much. So he taught himself how to wet sand, cut and polish paint so Red could get it to where he wanted it to be.

1964 Ford Galaxie Trim

Once your ride starts to look good, what comes next? More power. So Red pulled the 390 cid Fe engine to swap in a 428. He started with adding a 4.25 stroke crank, bored 40 over, added custom Diamond pistons, a hydraulic roller cam, hydraulic lifters and some roller rockers. Then he topped the engine off with a new set of BBM aluminum heads, a dual quad intake and two 600 Holley Carburetors. Red then finished everything with a 4 speed toploader, a 9 inch rear and some aftermarket 3.80 gears. It’s safe to say that Red knew exactly what he wanted and how to do it.

1964 Ford Galaxie Engine

But not everything is as simple as it sounds. Red was continuing to have trouble dialing in the dual carbs so he took it to a local shop to have his engine looked at. Just as the car was driving into the shop he suffered another bout of heartbreak with a 1964 Galaxie. The brake pedal pin holding the brake booster arm in came out and the car sailed into a set of heavy steel doors. Then a door fell onto the car. It hit the hood, bumper, fender and grille. Red decided to just start from the ground up after everything he learned and repaint the car once more after this fiasco. He also decided to add a Crites tear drop to the hood while he was at it.

1964 Ford Galaxie Rear

Red’s favorite thing about this classic is the old school look it carries. It has the look and gives him the exact same feeling he had when he was young. Red loves how the dark blue paint job and the Cragar wheels make the car pop on the outside, and the 428 stroker makes it hop when you’re inside. This was the car Red dreamed about when he was a kid and after many years, lots of hard work and sweat it was a dream come true. Though, he says, a childhood dream car is never truly finished.

1964 Ford Galaxie Front

Flashback – SEMA 2015

All car people have heard of Eleanor and Bullitt, almost all have heard of SEMA, few have gotten to go to SEMA and only one guy has a car that combines all three.  If you have seen the Season 3 episode for this build then you know whom we are referring to.  Join us as we look back at that agonizingly wonderful build that produced a beautiful piece of handcrafted moving artwork.  Since we have a build page for this already we decided to share the other aspect of this build and share some of the SEMA experience.  If you would like to see the build page click here.

Thanks for sharing the love and support you guys and gals give us and we look forward to next year at SEMA, when we once again will attempt to bring an epic build and hopefully achieve another speeding work of art.

Fan Car Friday – 1955 Buick Century

Next week we will be going to SEMA. At SEMA there will be countless beautiful cars, tons of restorations to be seen and other cars that represent the top 1% of builds. Prior to SEMA everyone is being teased by wonderful cars like Ford’s “7 Mustangs”, the fine works the Ring Brothers put out and countless others like the Chevrolet Hot Wheels Camaro. But today we look at something quite the opposite. These next few weeks all anyone will hear about is the story behind the transformation of the car. In this writeup we will do the opposite, we will talk about the mentality behind not changing it. In fact, we take a look back at something that would be overlooked by many or quickly taken to a paint booth to make into a show car. Today we look at a 1955 Buick Century.

Fan Car Friday is a segment where we want to share with the world the automobiles that our fans restored. These cars are not for sale and we have absolutely no affiliation/relationship with the cars, the build or the owners, we saw the photos and felt they should be shared with the world to inspire others on their build. Or, simply put, its great eye candy for those of us who can’t make it to car shows or meetups as often as we would like. This post was written with verbal consent from the owner.

1955 Buick Century

This vehicle was found in a barn about a year ago. Scottie had a friend come across it and immediately called him. A quick drive and some negotiating later the Buick changed hands to someone who could take care of it and off to its new home it went. There were two things changed on this car, and for good reason. The first is the headlights. This car is going to be driven frequently, so something safe and modern had to be bolted on. The second is the wheels. Again, it came to safety and a little bit of vanity. They had to match the look of the car, and it was well executed. Don’t worry though, these 6 original parts are stored safely in a box and can be reverted back to original in under 30 minutes.

People often like to take a car of the past and turn it into something new and modern. They want to put on some new suspension, drop in a big engine and turn it into something that looks old but feels new. Don’t get us wrong-That can be tons of fun, it can allow you to overcome the technological limitations of the past and turn something that was a Sunday driver into something that can be driven across the country to your friend’s wedding or on a whim to your kid’s graduation because the weather is nice. But there is something to be said about driving a car the way it was. And you hear that phrase often “the way it was” in the car building community. People remember the hardwork and fun that went into the cars of the past but the modern conveniences of today replace the ill remembered troubles from back in the day.

Cars today are so quiet, they drive so smooth, they accelerate without issue and you can often hit 80 on the highway without realizing it because of how solid everything is put together. Sometimes, though we need a reminder of how everything used to be, that’s where this Buick Century comes in. Sure, those restomods are fun and really let you live the dream you had when you were a kid. But also getting to sit in something that makes you really feel the road, doesn’t allow you to drift off and day dream, something that requires you to be in tune with the car is fun in its own kind of way.

1955 Buick Century

If you do a quick google search you will see a great deal of restored Buick Century cars. They have disk brakes, they have an engine swap or maybe an EFI system and often have replaced parts. But that’s the issue with them. They have some modern components, but some are still old. And that’s where you run into problems. They may have a monster engine, but the car cant take it and it controls a little funny. They may have a great new transmission, but it changes the feeling of the car or it shift heavy. It may have disk brakes, but they now require you to apply more force than before because the system wasn’t designed for that and the owner didn’t properly replace the assisting power. It be able to go 100 miles an hour, but everything feels like its about to come apart. You get the picture.

Something is to be said about taking the car the way it was, and driving it the way that teams of men and hundreds of thousands of work hours intended it to be. Sure, the paint job may not be great. But I guarantee you park this behind any modern Corvette or Mustang and more people will be looking to talk with you or grab a quick photo before they do those other two cars.

1955 Buick Century

Today we want to thank Scottie. Not for this being a time machine back into the past. Not for being some well preserved, near pristine, all original car. And not for even letting it sit as a perfect example of mother nature and father time working together to make this car as it sits today. But for taking ownership of this car and letting it continue to be an old relic of the past. Taking something many would add to their collection to brag about and instead turning it into a car he drive whenever he feels like it.

Fan Car Friday: The 1968 Chevelle

The car for this post is the same owner as the 1959 Lincoln Continental we highlighted a few weeks ago. Today will be an extra long Fan Car Friday on Facebook and as even longer writeup on the website.  This is because all Thursday and Friday shows are having a break this week to allow the Barrett-Jackson auctions have air time. This build started out as a 1968 Chevelle Malibu Sport Coup. It now has a 307 with a 3 speed manual, but used to have an SS 350 SBC from a 68’ Camaro matched to a 2 speed powerglide when a previous owner tried to make it a drag car.

1968 Chevelle

Fan Car Friday is a segment where we want to share with the world the automobiles that our fans restored. These cars are not for sale and we have absolutely no affiliation/relationship with the cars, the build or the owners, we saw the photos and felt they should be shared with the world to inspire others on their build. Or, simply put, its great eye candy for those of us who can’t make it to car shows or meetups as often as we would like. All posts are made with written consent of the owners.

1968 Chevelle

The story begins with Bryan. His dad was a big do it yourselfer in the garage, and always asked for Bryan’s help when he worked. Soon being forced to help his dad turned into an obsession. Bryan often found himself in the garage of his friends, with their car obsessed father, instead of hanging with the friend! Every week Bryan and his dad would watch car shows, auctions and read magazines together always saying “one day we’ll get one”. Well, when Bryan turned 23 he decided it was time for some change, he was going to move west and buy himself his first real car-He wanted to end the “One day we’ll get one” conversation. He spent many nights searching craigslist, online sites, forums and local ads all throughout the country to find the right car. If a car is worth having, it won’t last long, so he knew he had to act fast no matter the distance of the vehicle.

1968 Chevelle

After many 3am nights Bryan went to purchase this fine beauty. Even before seeing it, Bryan already knew he was going to buy it. He purchased the car for cool 7k. It came with a drag car setup and he was supposed to drive it 2 hours home, only it broke down 15 minutes into his drive. There was a loud bang, smoke followed and it felt like a bomb went off inside the car…the engine had blown. The seller was a standup guy, he immediately showed up trying to help, to no avail, and paid for a flatbed to take the car back to Bryan’s driveway. When they arrived back with the car Bryan’s father asked “what was going on, what is that?” Being the wisecracker he is, Bryan simply said “It’s a Chevelle!” Bryan said he blew the engine and needed to stow it in the garage. His father laughed, and opened the door to let him park it with a simple “ok”. In all reality though, his father was even more excited about having a Chevelle at the house than Bryan was.

1968 Chevelle

After diving into the engine bay Bryan discovered the time and money it would take to fix this was not only more expensive than an engine swap, it would probably be less reliable. Luckily, with good friends and neighbors rallying behind him, they did a swap and it went smoothly. The new 350 was in and it ran wonderfully.

Bryan’s dad was giddy, he hugged Bryan with a huge smile on his face. During this entire process Bryan’s dad couldn’t stop talking about how surreal it was. His son, Bryan, now had the same make, model and year car he did when he was only 17 years old. Talk about a trip back to the past.

1968 Chevelle

Now came the real nitty gritty parts of the restoration. The brakes, wiring nightmares, undoing the abuse and other ridiculous “mods” other owners had done throughout the years. Spending literally every second of free time on this car just to get it going. Pulling all nighters with the Chevelle because he wouldn’t be able to sleep because he was so close to getting X, Y or Z done on the car. His mother was getting worried, his father was getting excited. Bryan spent almost a thousand hours in two months working on it. At some points he was caught talking to the car as he worked on it, he just chalks that up to sleep deprivation. In the end, Bryan wouldn’t trade that for anything. He conquered the mountain, the car was glorious (His bank account though, not so much).

1968 Chevelle

He jumped in the car and he immediately realized the two speed power glide had to go. Back on the jacks the car went and in came a new 700r4 with a B&M Megashifter for more fun. This was going to be Bryan’s daily driver; there could be no hesitations in making this car perfect. With no savings left, Bryan now had something that you couldn’t put a price on; a beautiful car, great memories and something you can’t quite describe-The privilege of restoring a car with your father.

1968 Chevelle

Now, what’s the first thing you do when you just finished building a car with a new engine? Drive it 2,000 miles across the country to San Diego of course. Despite having minimal tools, the car performed flawlessly the entire trip. It wanted to be back on the road, it wanted to drive across America, the car just needed to be back in its element. Being his daily driver, the car made Bryan plenty of friends in no time out in California. People wanted to talk about his car, many wanted to just look at it, others wanted to know how a guy so young could do almost all of that on his own. Bryan just said he couldn’t see himself in anything other than a classic.

1968 Chevelle

When Bryan moved back to the Midwest things weren’t as smooth. Overheating in Vegas traffic and fuel starvation in the mountains of Colorado tried to stop him, but Bryan was determined and some 40 hours later he was back at his parent’s place. Bryan opted to drive something better suited to Midwest weather. This is also the time when he got the 1959 Lincoln Continental we shared the other week. Having these two cars plus another 73’ Mini Cooper was catching up to him financially. One car had to go. But Bryan would rather sleep in the cars to save money on gas and insurance before letting one go. But then something great happened. His father’s 60th birthday was coming up, the big 6-0. Something special had to be done. His father had this car in his youth, was more excited at times than Bryan was, he always said he would have a 68’ Chevelle again if he could. Bryan knew what he was going to do. There are truly no words that can describe the feeling, the moment, the room, the emotions or the thoughts everyone felt when Bryan gave the keys to his father. The car is now slowly getting upgraded every year with suspension, brakes, interior and other small things. All the while Bryan has the privilege of working on this car for his father 95% of the time. Bryan’s father wants to swap a 396 into it like he had when he was 17, but this always goes back to the “one day we’ll have one” conversation. Some of Bryan and his father’s best memories are riding in their classics together, the 1959 Continental and 1968 Chevelle.

https://www.oldride.com/carphotos/gallery/401977625789.jpg

Above photo/advertisement with use from oldride.com

Bryan’s favorite thing about the car is anyone who drives it feels like they own the world. It sounds mean at idle, ferocious when you step on the gas. His father’s favorite thing about the Chevelle is the car being a time machine, taking him back to when he was 17 years old, playing some Pink Floyd, AC/DC or whatever classics he can and just slam on the gas and go. No matter what is going on, it always makes him feel better.




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